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Invergarry




The  tiny village of Invergarry (Inbhir Garadh) is situated on the River Garry, at the heart of the Great Glen, an ideal base from which to explore the Scottish Highlands.
 
On nearby Loch Oich visitors can experience adventure sports such as hillwalking, canoeing, white-water rafting, sailing, windsurfing, water-skiing and of course mountain biking on the Great Glen Cycle Route. More traditional pastimes such as pony trekking, salmon and trout fishing, and boat trips are all available close by, as well as the breathtaking scenery and waterfalls which can be found on the Glen Garry forest walks. There are plenty of lowland walks for the less energetic, and there are eight golf courses within an hours’ drive of the village. Every summer the Glengarry Highland Games take place, attracting visitors from all over the world, who compete in traditional Highland sports such as caber tossing, hammer throwing and Highland Dancing.
 
In the grounds of Glengarry Castle Hotel lies the ruined seat of the chiefs of the Macdonnell clan, Invergarry Castle. The castle was built in the early 1600s on the strategic site of Raven’s Rock, overlooking Lock Oich. It had a bloody history, being burnt to the ground by General Monk in 1654. It was rebuilt, but occupied by the English and burnt down again in 1716. Rebuilt for the final time, it was visited by Bonnie Prince Charlie and is reputed to have provided a resting place for him following the Battle of Culloden. It was eventually pillaged and burnt to the ground by Cumberland in 1754, as revenge for Glengarry’s part in the Jacobite rebellion.
 
The Glengarry Castle hotel itself is a beautiful piece of Scottish Baronial architecture, designed by David Bryce, who also designed over 200 buildings in Scotland, including The Bank of Scotland building and Fettes College in Edinburgh, the school attended by former British Prime Minister Tony Blair.
 
The Glengarry Heritage centre provides a fascinating insight into the history of the village, and with census information available, is a useful resource for visitors wishing to trace their Macdonnell or Donald clan heritage.
 
Visitors can travel north to experience the mystery of Loch Ness and the majesty of Urquhart castle, and to enjoy watching the boats passing through the five locks on the Caledonian Canal at Fort Augustus. A mile or so south of the village, at North Laggan, is a monument by the side of the road standing over The Well of the Seven Heads. This tells the grisly story of the Keppoch Murders, one of the most infamous clan murders which took place at Roy Bridge in the 17th century. 
 
For an unforgettable day trip, take the beautiful road to the Isle of Skye, stopping in Applecross for a seafood lunch. A trip to Ben Nevis, the highest mountain in the British Isles, is a must, if not to climb the mountain itself, then to try a ‘wee dram’ at the Ben Nevis Distillery at the foot of the mountain.
 

The old village of Invergarry is ideally situated to explore the Scottish Highlands, particularly the route west through Glen Garry with its fascinating history and scenery.
The local pub "The Invergarry Hotel" is an ideal refreshment stop for both walkers and fisherman and often is a base for local musicians to perform on a weekend.
The village is sited directly on the Great Glen Cycle route and provides an ideal stopping point for cyclists looking to quench their thirsts.

Inside the entrance to the Glengarry Castle Hotel stand the ruins of Invergarry Castle, once the stronghold of the MacDonnells of Glengarry and later destroyed by the Duke of Cumberland as he wreaked revenge on the Highlands in the aftermath of Culloden.
The hotel was later built as the main house of the Ellice family, who made their fortune from the Hudson Bay Company in Canada and who were the main driving force behind the creation of the Victorian planned village.

A mile or so south of the village, at North Laggan, is a monument by the side of the road standing over The Well of the Seven Heads. This tells the grisly story of the Keppoch Murders, one of the most infamous clan murders which took place at Roy Bridge in the 17th century.
The area is great, not just for its past history but also because it  has lots to keep all the family entertained; on the east shore of Loch Oich, near North Laggan, is the Great Glen Water Park, an outdoor activities centre offering numerous adventure sports, including white-water rafting, canoeing, mountain biking, rock climbing, sailing, windsurfing, hill walking and water skiing.